Southwestern Torch Bearers Keep it in the Family Reviewed by Momizat on . Joy Kraft Miles left a career as a teacher to attend law school. She had good reason to be confident in her ability to succeed. "My mother went to Southwestern Joy Kraft Miles left a career as a teacher to attend law school. She had good reason to be confident in her ability to succeed. "My mother went to Southwestern Rating: 0
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Southwestern Torch Bearers Keep it in the Family

Torch Bearers at CommencementJoy Kraft Miles left a career as a teacher to attend law school. She had good reason to be confident in her ability to succeed. “My mother went to Southwestern with four children living in the house when I was a teenager,” she said. “I figured if she could do it 25 years ago, then I could start a new career pathway with a toddler.”

Marcia Kraft ’91 advised her daughter to study hard and be patient with the process of becoming a lawyer. “Joy saw me as a role model,” she said. “She felt that ‘if my mom could do it, so could I,’ so there was never any need for me to coach her in that direction.”

Marcia and Joy are not alone. They are continuing Southwestern’s rich tradition of torch bearers. Generations of Southwestern graduates have taken tremendous pride in watching family members follow in their footsteps. Seventeen members of Southwestern’s Class of 2014 are celebrating the legacy started by their kin. During the May 18 Commencement ceremony, they will be joined onstage by their alumni relatives who will present them with their diplomas.

Robert Dickerson ’79 had such a good experience at Southwestern that his enthusiasm for the school influenced his daughter. “I actually only applied to Southwestern,” Alyssa Dickerson said. “It was the only school I wanted to attend.”

Her dad has devoted his career to intellectual property litigation, but Alyssa hopes to practice family law. Robert Dickerson calls his daughter’s decision to attend Southwestern very rewarding and reassuring. “That a child wants to do what you do sort of means you haven’t screwed things up too badly at home,” he said. “And that they want to go to the same school you did underscores all that a bit.” Continue reading…

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